Broadcasting Students Work on Nationally Televised Games

Three West Liberty University communications students were praised for their knowledge and professionalism when they recently worked on the national broadcast of a high school basketball tournament in Wheeling. Samantha Gretchen, Britni Lindgren and Todd Ullom, led by WLU instructor and WLSN producer Chuck Scatterday, worked alongside ESPN professionals on the sports network’s broadcast of Cancer Research Classic games. Dave Andrews, ESPN camera operator, said, “The girls were great as utes (utility workers). They knew what they were doing all night and had my back. It’s a great feeling to have when you’re busy staring down a viewfinder for three hours.” The students’ enthusiasm impressed Dadja Roerig, a video operator. “They were quick to help and pitched in early and often,” she said. Mike Krivens, operations producer, echoed that sentiment. “Todd was spot on both days. He had a good attitude and was fast to help when directed. He had no complaints and did the job, and they knew how to over/under cables. That’s ‘TV101’ and they had it covered.  Good job!” “Over/under” refers to a method of preparing television cables for storage. It is considered by the television industry the only proper way to coil cables, as it protects them and ensures that they will lay flat for their next use. Jeff Habak, a freelance camera operator who photographed the basketball games for ESPN, told Scatterday, “Your students understood what it took to get the job done.” Scatterday, who worked at ESPN for many years before joining WLU and its television operations, said he was pleased with the trio’s work. Working with the ESPN crew was an invaluable...

McCullough Presents Scholarly research at National Conferences

West Liberty University’s Ryan McCullough has a busy semester ahead of him. In addition to the communications instructor’s usual WLU courseload of oral communications, argumentation and debate, organizational communication and media ethics classes, and guiding the university’s forensics team, he will be presenting scholarly research at several conferences in 2012. Last year, he and co-author Dan Mistich presented a paper, “Poststructural Prudence: Rethinking Phronesis Through Derrida,” at the National Communication Association’s convention in New Orleans. The research examined the works of Aristotle and the French philosopher Jacques Derrida. During the spring semester, he will present papers at the Appalachian Studies Association conference, the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association’s national conference and at the Rhetoric Society of America’s meeting. “Participating in scholarship,” McCullough said, “makes me a better teacher. It helps me become more familiar with the literature and subjects the students will be studying.” In addition to presenting their research at professional conferences, McCullough and Mistich have co-authored a chapter of a soon-to-be-published anthology about pop culture novelist, philosopher and essayist Chuck Klosterman, “Chuck Klosterman and Philosophy,” edited by Seth Vannatta and published by Open Court. “The chapter we have written is, ‘Is that what you really want?’” McCullough explained. “It is about desire in Klosterman’s writings and how desire is communicated.” In his third year of teaching at WLU, McCullough earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Marshall...