The Trumpet reviews of “The Cripple of Inishmaan”

[article originally in The Trumpet] By Hannah Courtney, Staff Writer The West Liberty University Hilltop Players kicked off their fall season with a sensational, eerie performance of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible”; an act that was truly a tough one to follow. However, they’ve pulled it off, going out with a clamoring, comical and emotion-inducing bang in their rendition of Martin McDonagh’s “The Cripple of Inishmaan.” The play is set in 1934 and takes place off the Western Coast of Ireland on an island known as Inishmaan. We follow the story of “Cripple” Billy Claven, given a name that speaks for itself as he has a disfigured arm and leg. Billy lives in a community that makes himself, and his condition, the butt of its ongoing joke, thus causing him to feel  like he belongs somewhere else. Billy’s ears perk up at JohnnyPateenMike’s first set of exciting news in twenty years: Auditions are being held for a movie to be filmed on Inishmore, a neighboring island. Viewers watch as Billy pursues acting, love, and understanding of what his parents were like prior to their death as well as searching for the real reason behind their death. If audience members found themselves walking away from the Hilltop Player’s previous performance of “The Crucible”             with a bit of a solemn feeling in their hearts, “The Cripple of Inishmaan” is the comic relief they’ve been yearning for. This play was nothing short of comical genius. The jokes are deprecating, sarcastic, condescending, morbid, perverted, or in short: something like an episode of Family Guy laced with Irish tradition and dialect. And, let’s face it, this is...