Course Descriptions


AT 100: Introduction to Athletic Training – 3 hours This course is designed to introduce students to the profession of Athletic Training.  Throughout this course, students will learn the history of the profession, information on epidemiology of athletic injuries, pre-participation physical exams, strength training/conditioning, pharmacology, environmental conditions, protective devices, emergency care and nutrition.  After completing this course the students should have the basic knowledge of the profession of athletic training.  Requires 30 hours of observation in the Athletic Training Room.

AT 200 Athletic Training Clinical Practicum I – 1 hour This clinical rotation allows for the sophomore level student to gain experience in the profession of Athletic Training outside of the classroom and in the clinical setting.  Under the supervision of a preceptor, the student will be challenged to transfer knowledge learned didactically and apply it in the clinical setting.  Students will be expected to begin to understand and demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  A minimum of 75 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 100

AT 205 Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II – 1 hour This clinical rotation allows for the sophomore level student to gain experience in the profession of Athletic Training outside of the classroom and in the clinical setting.  Under the supervision of a preceptor, the student will be challenged to transfer knowledge learned didactically and apply it in the clinical setting as well as build on current information learned in the first clinical practicum.  Students will be expected to begin to understand and demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  A minimum of 75 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 200

300: Athletic Training Clinical Practicum III – 2 hours Building on the first year of clinical experiences, students will continue to be challenged to transfer knowledge gained in the classroom and apply it in the clinical settings. Under the supervision of a preceptor, the students will be expected to demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  A minimum of 150 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 205

305: Athletic Training Clinical Practicum IV – 2 hours Building on the first year of clinical experiences, students will continue to be challenged to transfer knowledge gained in the classroom and apply it in the clinical settings. Under the supervision of a preceptor, the students will be expected to demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  A minimum of 150 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 300

400: Athletic Training Clinical Practicum V – 2 hours Senior level students will now have four semesters of clinical practicum cohort entering their final year of the program.  The students will continue to be challenged to transfer knowledge gained in the classroom and apply it in the clinical settings. Under the supervision of a preceptor, the students will be expected to demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  At the senior level it is to be expected the student will be polishing the skills of a successful clinician such as evaluation skills, critical thinking and problem solving, exercise and rehabilitation prescriptions and appropriate decision making when diagnosing injuries and choosing modalities for treatment plans.  A minimum of 150 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 305

405: Athletic Training Clinical Practicum VI – 2 hours Senior level students will now have four semesters of clinical practicum cohort entering their final year of the program.  The students will continue to be challenged to transfer knowledge gained in the classroom and apply it in the clinical settings. Under the supervision of a preceptor, the students will be expected to demonstrate the knowledge and skills identified in the Standards as designated by the CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) and its eight content areas:  Evidence-Based Practice; Prevention and Health Promotion; Clinical Examination and Diagnosis; Acute Care of Injury and Illness; Therapeutic Interventions; Psychosocial Strategies and Referral; Healthcare Administration; and Professional Development and Responsibility.  At the senior level it is to be expected the student will be polishing the skills of a successful clinician such as evaluation skills, critical thinking and problem solving, exercise and rehabilitation prescriptions and appropriate decision making when diagnosing injuries and choosing modalities for treatment plans.  A minimum of 150 clinical hours is required to earn credit for the class. Prerequisites: AT 400

AT 220: Athletic Training Taping and Bracing – 3 hours An overview of bandaging, taping and bracing that would be expected from an entry-level athletic trainer.  The course covers the basic components of taping and bracing with different types of tape, bandages, and wraps and explains the theories behind techniques.  Students will be able to relate the techniques to different body parts and pathologies that would need taping and bracing.  In addition, they will learn concepts didactically and need to demonstrate those techniques on each other in a lab setting. Prerequisite: AT 100

AT 225: Therapeutic Modalities – 3 hours This class is designed to provide an introduction to the use of therapeutic modalities and their application for athletic injuries.  Students will learn about the injury response cycle and healing process and how to incorporate modalities to these processes.  Not only how modalities work, but the physiology behind their therapeutic effects will be discussed.  Students will become proficient as far as application, electrode placement, patient set-up and machine parameters in most forms of modalities used today.  Prerequisite: AT 220

AT 330: Rehabilitation of Lower Extremity Athletic Injuries – 3 hours This course is designed to educate the student in the rehabilitative aspects of patient care.  Therapeutic exercise, strength training, range of motion exercises, aquatic therapy and other rehab techniques specific to the lower extremity and trunk are focused on in this class. Prerequisites: AT 225

AT 335: Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Athletic Injuries – 3 hours This course is designed to educate the student in the rehabilitative aspects of patient care.  Therapeutic exercise, strength training, range of motion exercises, aquatic therapy and other rehab techniques specific to the upper extremity and cervical spine are focused on in this class.  Prerequisites: AT 330

AT 340: Orthopedic Assessment of the Lower Body – 3 hours This course concentrates on the evaluation techniques and special tests needed for the proper diagnosis of orthopedic injuries.  The class deals with the lower extremity and trunk.  Students will become efficient in the necessary skills and hands on techniques athletic trainers utilize to evaluate orthopedic injuries.  The students will also learn to determine when referrals and further care is indicated.  A strong knowledge of anatomy is needed for this class.  Prerequisites: AT 225

AT 345: Orthopedic Assessment of the Upper Body – 3 hours This course concentrates on the evaluation techniques and special tests needed for the proper diagnosis of orthopedic injuries.  The class deals with the upper extremity and cervical region.  Students will become efficient in the necessary skills and hands on techniques athletic trainers utilize to evaluate orthopedic injuries.  The students will also learn to determine when referrals and further care is indicated.  A strong knowledge of anatomy is needed for this class. Prerequisites: AT 340

AT 355: General Medical Conditions and Pharmacology in Athletic Training – 3 hours The course is designed to provide the Athletic Training Student with the knowledge and the skills of recognition, management and referral of otherwise less common pathologies that may be seen in the field of athletic training.  It discusses disorders and pathologies of the body using a systematic approach by utilizing the body systems as a guide.  The student will be educated in a wide range of conditions that could occur with any physically active person at any time. Prerequisite:  AT 330/340

AT 410: Seminar in Athletic Training – 2 hours This class will deal with discussions on contemporary issues in Athletic Training including current research and implications and technological advances.  Evidence-Based Medicine and research, research design is emphasized in this class. Prerequisite: AT 335/345/355

AT 420 Athletic Training- A Problem-Based Approach I – 3 hours This senior level course is intended to challenge the students to become critical thinkers and problem solvers.  Using a case-based scenario, students are in small groups and forced to identify, research and discuss relevant topics related to a specific case or topic.  The students take learning into their own hands, as the instructor is merely a facilitator in discussion.  A very challenging learning style and much different from the traditional styles of learning this course aims to review all topics that students have learned over the previous semesters and forces them to problem solve and apply knowledge. Prerequisites: 335/345/355

AT 425 Athletic Training- A Problem-Based Approach II – 3 hours This senior level course is intended to challenge the students to become critical thinkers and problem solvers.  Using a case-based scenario, students are in small groups and forced to identify, research and discuss relevant topics related to a specific case or topic.  The students take learning into their own hands, as the instructor is merely a facilitator in discussion.  A very challenging learning style and much different from the traditional styles of learning this course aims to review all topics that students have learned over the previous semesters and forces them to problem solve and apply knowledge.  The second level class deals with more involved patients. Prerequisites:  410/420

AT 435: Administrative Aspects of Athletic Training – 2 hours This class focuses on an introduction to organizational and administrative aspects in athletic training. Topics include athletic training room facility design, medical record keeping procedures, personnel and program management, budget planning, drug testing, and legal aspects and other various topics dealing with professional issues. Prerequisite: AT 410/420

AT 445: Athletic Training Capstone – 3 hours Designed for second semester students in Athletic Training.  Will emphasize preparing for the national board exam.  This will be a comprehensive review of all topics in AT as deemed relevant according to the CAATE standards set forth.  Students will practice test taking skills, self evaluation study techniques and learn how to apply and register to take the BOC exam. Prerequisite:  410/420