Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Art Therapy


The College of Arts and Communication is pleased to announce the approval of a Bachelor of Science in Creative Arts Therapy. Art therapy is a field of psychology that relies on art and creativity to explore trauma and seek healing for a wide range of individuals.

Students interested in enrolling in this new Art Therapy degree program should contact Brian Fencl, Chair of the Department of Journalism, Communication Studies and Visual Art by phone at (304) 336-8433 or by email at [email protected].

Art Therapy in a Nutshell
Art therapy is easily defined as a form of demiurgic therapy that utilizes the unique perspective in the creative process offering reconciliation toward the individual’s inner and outer worlds often it often bridges the gap of concerns, thoughts and feelings between the individuals physical, mental, and emotional well-being. The creative process involved in expressing one’s self artistically can help people to resolve issues as well as develop and manage their behaviors and feelings, reduce stress, and improve self-esteem and awareness.

It is a therapy that universally allows the individual to create in an expressive and safe setting in which professionals can work with them and delve into the underlying messages communicated through art. While Art therapy is not all things to all people, it can achieve different things for different people. It can be used for counseling by therapists, promote healing, treatment, rehabilitation, psychotherapy. Art therapy can be used to message to one’s inner-self that may provide the individual with a deeper understanding of him or herself.

Using Art Therapy
Art Therapy is a form of creativity inherent within the fabric of the individual’s expression and can be use by almost anyone. Art therapy strives to offer a visual form of conscious and unconscious reconciliation in a world collaborating with a multitude of ways to communicate and express one’s self.  One of the major differences between art therapy and other forms of communication is that most other forms of communication elicit the use of words or language as a means of communication. Often times, humans are incapable of aptly expressing themselves or identifying their underlying feelings and as in the case of a child, they may lack the sophistication to succinctly communicate the nature of their conflict often finding themselves within a limited range of verbalization.

One of the qualities present in Art as therapy is the ability for a person to express his/her feelings through any form of art. Though the sheer act of creative expression, reconciliation may begin to take place on an unconscious level in a manner that is healing to that individual, as it simultaneously eliminates the need for association. In this manner, it can be a cathartic means of resolving conflict without the need to associate… One of the most predominate aspects of creative arts in therapy are other types of expressive therapies (such as the performing arts, drama, music and movement), and although the expressive art therapy typically utilizes more traditional forms of art, such as painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, or a variety of other types of visual art expression. However, there is increasing milieu’s that have begun to find Creative Arts in therapy useful in many other types of settings such as, medical, mental health as well as the simple act of creating.

To be or not to be Artistically Talented
One does not need be artistically talented. Art therapy cradles the concept that often the basic premise to understanding the world around us is largely dependent on both the hands and eyes. Though one may be fearful of the use of creative tools and it may seem different and unnatural at first, it is typically because the individual is not used to communicating via the arts. The creative process can be one of the most elucidating aspects of resolution. Aligned with an art therapist, it becomes a tool for communication, ignoring the need to be talented; it relies on communication as a mechanism exploring the visual imagery, symbolic process and relationship to art rather than talent. The goal is not necessarily to create an art masterpiece.

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Using Art Therapy
As with most any therapy, art as therapy is an integrative creative process – used as a means to help to improve one’s emotional state or mental well-being. As an integral component of a treatment team it can be a substantially contributing aspect to determine the goals of therapy. In an individual process and as a “stand alone therapy” outside of a clinic or hospital setting, it can be used to relieve stress, tension, or used as a mode of self-discovery. Many people enjoy creative outlets. Ultimately, the goal in art therapy, is toward developing coping styles, while widening the range of human experience by creating equivalences for those experiences.

Professional Art Therapy and Art Therapists
Art therapists are trained in therapy and art. They have studied and mastered psychology and human development. Art therapists typically have a practice, clinical, hospital based or private practice. They, also, work in academic, counseling and education. They are masters in this niche when it comes to using art as a springboard for everything from art therapy assessments of another person’s current state to treatment for a serious illness. Art therapists can work with people of all ages, sex, culture, etc. They can help an individual, a couple, a family, or groups of people. Depending on the situation, there may be numerous creative therapists working together as a clinical team.

Art therapists are trained to pick up on nonverbal symbols and metaphors that are often expressed through art and the creative process, concepts that are usually difficult to express with words. It is through this process that the individual really begins to see the effects of art therapy in a milieu that promotes the synthesis of the creative process, product and/or associative references. Art Therapists assist with the creative expression with that integration and synthesis throughout the process and finally with the product.

CURRICULUM (FALL 2013)

GENERAL STUDIES ………………………………………………48
REQUIRED CAT COURSES …………………………………. 27
CAT 200 Introduction to Art Therapy ……………………………3
CAT 300 Developmental and Comparative Stages in Art .3
CAT 301 Art Therapy Studio……………………………………… 3
CAT 302 Art Therapy Studio II…………………………………….3
CAT 310 Art Therapy Ethics……………………………………….3
CAT 340 Art Therapy Literature and Symbolism……………3
CAT 403 Art Therapy Internship and observation………….3
CAT 440 Art Therapy Assessments and Techniques …….3
CAT 486 Senior Project, Research, Thesis, Clinical Internship Colloquium ………………………………………..3

REQUIRED ART STUDIO COURSES……………………….36

ART 104 Drawing I……………………………………………………3
ART 110 Design I …………………………………………………….3
ART 150 Art Appreciation for the Art Major …………………..3
ART 160 Design II ………………………………………………….. 3
ART 204 Drawing II ………………………………………………….3
ART 230 Printmaking I ………………………………………………3

Choose one course from the following:

ART 210 Watercolor Painting I ………………………………….3
ART 215 Oil/Acrylic Painting I ……………………………………3

Choose one course from the following:

ART 220 Ceramics I………………………………………………… 3
ART 250 Crafts I……………………………………………………… 3

Choose one course from the following:

ART 341 Art History II ……………………………………………….3
ART 342 Art History III ………………………………………………3
ART 343 Survey of Non-Western Art …………………………. 3
ADDITIONAL 9 HOURS IN ART STUDIO ELECTIVES (MUST BE IN A 300 OR 400 LEVEL COURSE)

REQUIRED PSYCHOLOGY COURSES ……………………..9

PSYC 322 Personality Psychology ……………………………..3
PSYC 441 Abnormal Psychology………………………………..3
PSYC 320 Psychology of Adulthood and Old Age …………3
PSYC 101 must be taken to fulfill the General Studies Requirement.

Creative Art Therapy Program Requirements:

Students in the CAT degree program will adhere to all of the following standards:

1. Minimum Grade Requirements

All students must meet the CAT requirements of an overall GPA of 2.0 and maintain a GPA of at least 2.5 within the CAT major. All students are required to pass CAT 486 Se- nior Project with a minimum grade of “C”. A minimum of 40 upper-level credit hours must successfully be completed in order to fulfill graduation requirements.

2. Sophomore Portfolio Review

CAT students will take Art Appreciation for the Art Major (ART 150) the spring semester of their sophomore year. The review is for the purpose of assessment and to identify problems with the students’ work or skills that may prevent them from completing the program.

3. Senior Project

The Capstone is a combined utilization of Research, The- sis, and Clinical Internship, to provide a comprehensive ap- plication component in the Creative Arts Therapy program. The goal of the Capstone is to integrate three cornerstones in combined didactic knowledge, research/thesis and clini- cal internship/observation.

 

 

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